The Handbrake-gctid259

Do you have a Rickman related project ? Share it in the garage
- One thread per project please !
TimS
Rickman Guru
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 7:53 pm

The Handbrake-gctid3654

Post by TimS » Mon Feb 23, 2015 9:08 pm

11751134353E285B0 wrote: A few corners still to cover but it's amazing the sense of luxury that thick underfelt gives.  Surely this deserves Axminster carpeting at the very least.


Will this be the first Ranger Limo? ;-)



It's over five years since we first declared SORN on this Ranger. If all goes to plan next month could finally see us back at the MoT station.


Good luck with that.



OOI, if you are gluing that carpet to the floor, what will happen to it if it gets wet? I glued the rubber to the floor of our Ranger because it doesn't matter if it gets wet and when daughters Corsa had sodden underfelt recently we had to pull it all out to dry it out ... but at least we were able to?



Of course (more floods and deeper_than_you_thought fords permitting) it shouldn't get wet in the first place ... <fingers crossed>. ;-)



It does look good though, especially with that dash (that confused me for a sec).



Cheers, T i m







JSalix
Seasoned Builder
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:06 am

The Handbrake-gctid3656

Post by JSalix » Fri Feb 27, 2015 8:49 am

Keeping the water out has never been a serious problem with the No.1 Ranger. You weren't one of those kids who always had to splash through the puddles were you Tim?!

Floor ribs in the glass fibre make for a rather uneven load space when the rear seats are folded forward. I've fitted wooden slats to create a flat surface. Here is the rear carpet waiting for its contact adhesive to go off.

JJ

Ex_Member

The Handbrake-gctid3658

Post by Ex_Member » Fri Feb 27, 2015 4:37 pm

Wow 2 years no posts and then back with a vengance. Great progress with the interior. Its something that often gets overlooked with builds but a dry, warmish quietish cabin makes a big improvement to the usability of one of these.

TimS
Rickman Guru
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 7:53 pm

The Handbrake-gctid3660

Post by TimS » Fri Feb 27, 2015 7:07 pm

0763072223283E4D0 wrote: Keeping the water out has never been a serious problem with the No.1 Ranger. You weren't one of those kids who always had to splash through the puddles were you Tim?!


Probably yes, and have always been close to water as my Dad was a sea Captain so we have always had boats in the family. ;-)



Floor ribs in the glass fibre make for a rather uneven load space when the rear seats are folded forward. I've fitted wooden slats to create a flat surface. Here is the rear carpet waiting for its contact adhesive to go off.

JJ




Again, that is something I haven't really considered, the 'ribbed' rear floor area. I can't remember if I stuck rubber matting to the rear floor or not (possibly not) but I normally have some rubber matting (the ribbed stuff) doubled up in the rear section that can be opened up over the whole rear section if I fold the seat forward. One thought is that the ribs offer a little resistance to to things moving about on the corners?



Whilst it is 'everyone to their own' (of course), I take the Ranger to be a pure post-apocolyptic / utility vehicle and so am (at the moment anyway) happy to keep it very simple. I have never had a radio in it for example! ;-)



For me the 'fun / point' *is* that it's basic and simple. I have a quiet air-conditioned box I can use if I want that but it would bother me if I spilled a bottle of water on the floor or had muddy dog feet all over the rear load area in that. If that happens in the Ranger, a bucket of hot water and a sponge has the inside all clean again. ;-)



Are your slats made out of real wood?



Cheers, T i m

TimS
Rickman Guru
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 7:53 pm

The Handbrake-gctid3662

Post by TimS » Fri Feb 27, 2015 7:23 pm

555D5D511E5D555C5845594358300 wrote: Wow 2 years no posts and then back with a vengance. Great progress with the interior. Its something that often gets overlooked with builds but a dry, warmish quietish cabin makes a big improvement to the usability of one of these.




I guess it depends on your needs and goals ... ;-)



Like, with our Ranger and it's leaky windscreen, having no carpets is a big bonus and makes it *more* useable for me and for my needs.



And as for comfort, if I wasn't in the Ranger I might be on a motorcycle instead. ;-)



I have been talking over IM to a guy in the USofA and often mention 'the kitcar'. He *assumed* I had a Lambo copy or a VW buggy and when I showed him a picture of a Ranger he was convinced it was a Suzuki jeep. Once I had persuaded him otherwise, he asked me why I would want something like that, especially as it didn't have a V8 engine. The answer was because I don't need it to have a V8 and 'enjoyed' the fact that it only had a (very simple and low power) 1300. ;-)



What do they say, 'KISS'. The more that is in / on there the more there is to go wrong. ;-)



Cheers, T i m

JSalix
Seasoned Builder
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:06 am

The Handbrake-gctid3664

Post by JSalix » Sun Mar 01, 2015 9:56 am

And isn't that why we choose the kit-car format, because it can be just what we imagine, not what the maker thought would impress us? Our number 1 car is very basic and functional. The remains of the headlining is coming adrift and the dash is perforated like a colander where switches once were. This one is our posh Sunday car, with a higher degree of comfort. Like anything once new, including this writer, we don't expect it to stay like that forever!

The slimmed down Metro rear seat set is now bolted down to the new end-of-roll grey carpet. An annoyance with the No1 car is that the folded rear seats rest on the back of the front ones and make for difficult adjustment between her little legs and my longer ones. Here there are stops to make them self-supporting.

Yes, a flurry of activity Em. Like many on the site, I've done a number of bigger projects over the years and know that the most indespensible component is my own enthusiasm. For two or three years an aged parent living with us made that hard to sustain. This year's resolution was simple. Complete the car and get it in use. My to-do list had 20 items in January. Now we're down to a mere handful.

JJ

TimS
Rickman Guru
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 7:53 pm

The Handbrake-gctid3666

Post by TimS » Mon Mar 02, 2015 8:12 am

7612765352594F3C0 wrote: And isn't that why we choose the kit-car format, because it can be just what we imagine, not what the maker thought would impress us?
Yeahbut what if we are happy with what the kit car maker gave us? ;-)  *Personally*, I have never felt the need to change what I was given car wise because in my world 'standard' makes my life easier (in many ways). But please don't get me wrong, I have no issue whatsoever with anyone doing what works for them (with any sort of car) [1]. ;-)



Our number 1 car is very basic and functional. The remains of the headlining is coming adrift and the dash is perforated like a colander where switches once were.


But that isn't the experience the manufacturer offered and so now you are left with the actions of others (or you if you drilled the holes <g>)? When I fitted a repeater for the trailer lights I did so by drilling a hole in a blank switch plate in the std Escort dash. That way, anyone wanting a std Ranger (or me) could put it back easily. ;-)



This one is our posh Sunday car, with a higher degree of comfort. Like anything once new, including this writer, we don't expect it to stay like that forever!


And that's fine (whatever the reason etc). Maybe if I *had* to use just the Ranger for anything other than utility type work then maybe I would do similar 'improvements'.



The slimmed down Metro rear seat set is now bolted down to the new end-of-roll grey carpet.


And very nice it all looks too! I have the Metro rear seat to match the fronts (that are fitted) but I haven't got round to doing the mods.



<snip>



My to-do list had 20 items in January. Now we're down to a mere handful.

JJ




I'm jealous (and impressed), that you 1) had a to-do list and 2) been able to work though it. My to-do list seems to get longer every day ... ;-(



Cheers, T i m



[1] Till I end up with it. <weg>

JSalix
Seasoned Builder
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:06 am

The Handbrake-gctid3668

Post by JSalix » Tue May 05, 2015 6:44 pm

Slightly stuttering progress at the end. While hanging upside down in the footwell(as you do), sorting out a few last minute odds and ends before MoT I discovered that my clutch pedal was moving almost as much left to right as it was back and forth. A bit disappointing to discover that my new poly-bushes in the pedalbox were disintegrating after zero miles on the road. Not quite 'the business' that I hoped for. Fortunately I never throw anything away so dug out the Ford originals and put them back.

JSalix
Seasoned Builder
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:06 am

The Handbrake-gctid3670

Post by JSalix » Tue May 05, 2015 6:53 pm

...followed by this exciting moment. A pass without advisories, and the run to the test station and back suggests it will be a very pleasant drive for years to come. Further road tests will follow once the road fund business is complete.

JJ

PaulG
Rickman Guru
Posts: 359
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 6:53 pm

The Handbrake-gctid3672

Post by PaulG » Thu May 07, 2015 7:32 pm

Well done JJ, car looks great :)

Post Reply