The Handbrake-gctid259

Do you have a Rickman related project ? Share it in the garage
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JSalix
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The Handbrake-gctid259

Post by JSalix » Sat Nov 14, 2009 5:40 pm

A jokey title my recently acquired Rickman has earned due to the damage done on collecting it. Today I had a first poke around this neglected Ranger, last on the road in October 2000. Thought I'd try to find out why the back wheels were reluctant to turn, though the cable and rod are free. You have to start somewhere.

The RH drum was jammed on two of the studs and distorted by the extension studs and spacers. From the protruding shoulder these appear to be too long for the hub. Fortunately I have a spare half shaft with a decent set in.

Angie's Potting Shed doesn't use spacers but this one has the other style of Weller wheels, with the angled, go-faster slots. Were these not available with a suitable offset? Any wheel knowledge gratefully received.

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Post by Out_of_This_World » Sun Nov 15, 2009 1:54 pm

Hi JJ,

I have had similar problems in the past to what you describe and overcame them a number of ways.

When I had  Dutton I fitted longer studs which allowed spacers without the danger of using extension studs. Later I replaced the rear axle with one from a Capri. This gives a wider base by around 100mm.

I have also in the past fitted packing washers on the inside of the drum on a temporary basis, only needs a couple of mm to stop the binding whilst I sorted out another problem of the time. (it stayed temporary for longer than it should without any problems, but thats another story).

Before changing the half shafts have you thought of giving clearance to the holes in the drums, or even changing the studs if they are deformed.  As you will be aware with an anvil (old socket) behind they are quite easy to replace.

I had a thought it maybe have been something to do with the Imperial/metric changeover but never got around to checking.

Good luck,

Bernard

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Post by Simon_Admin » Mon Nov 16, 2009 10:07 pm

Not sure about the studs being too long, sure they do have a longer shoulder than the standard studs (I just checked mine) but as long as the drum fits over them I can't see the 3-4mm of extra shoulder getting in the way - other than if you decide to put steelies back on then the larger diameter may stop the wheels bolting up.



If the drums are sticking on the studs you could make the holes bigger. Anyway I have heard that you may be getting some nice new wheels (and nice they are too) !

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Post by JSalix » Tue Nov 17, 2009 11:25 am

Thanks for that guys. Yes, the problem is that the two shouldered studs don't fit the holes in the drum so have bent it outwards to form a kind of countersink from inside when the stud extensions were tightened. Knocking flat and opening them out seems a bit of a bodge because the drum would still only fit one way and it might mess up the drum/shoe alignment. Washers on the back of the studs would certainly work though. However, as you say Simon... Good news travels fast! Yes, possibly new wheels, and a galvanised chassis too. Those rusty chassis pictures had me running scared, though a little 'gentle' tapping with a welder's slag hammer didn't actually make any holes.

I'm gathering ideas for this one. Somewhere at the back of the garage is a 2ltr Pinto covered in cobwebs. I wonder if it still works.

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Post by Ex_Member » Tue Nov 17, 2009 12:35 pm

680C684D4C4751220 wrote: I'm gathering ideas for this one. Somewhere at the back of the garage is a 2ltr Pinto covered in cobwebs. I wonder if it still works.


You want ideas? Sell the pinto to an anorak who's trying to weld some rust back into the vague shape of a MkII Escort, get a Zetec out of an old Escort & talk to these people about engine mounts http://retroford.co.uk/shop2/



(Yes, I'm getting quite enthusiastic about the Zetec swap now)



T

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Post by Simon_Admin » Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:53 pm

0B6F0B2E2F2432410 wrote: Knocking flat and opening them out seems a bit of a bodge because the drum would still only fit one way and it might mess up the drum/shoe alignment.


Ah sorry didn't realise it was only one stud that has a problem, in that case you would be better off replacing the offending stud, If all four where the same I'd go for the enlarge the hole method.



As I re drilled the 4 holes for the studs in the front hubs just so I could use the sierra studs I had kicking about instead of buying new ones I'm probably not the best person to be giving advice  ;)



"It's an interference fit, we interfered with it and NOW it FITS !"

JSalix
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Post by JSalix » Thu Nov 19, 2009 5:05 pm

I know the Pinto is a bit old fashioned, but it has the advantage of being there. Still, something more modern would be nice. Maybe if I'm going to do all that work it's silly not to upgrade to a Zetec. I'll have to chat up the chancellor (in the kitchen.)

Anyway, I have a sense that project Handbrake is under way. Yesterday we collected the new, shopsoiled galvanised chassis and some sparkly alloy wheels, which you can see if you peer into the back of the potting shed. Thanks to Simon for posting the 'Rickman parts hoard'.

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Post by JSalix » Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:51 pm

A pneumatic impact driver from Aldi; one of the best 20 quids worth I've ever spent. It tackles rusted bolts with a fraction of the effort of a socket on a long lever, and after a while if they won't shift it wrings the 6 and 8mm ones clean off. Just the job for dismantling a Ranger project like the Handbrake, in the advanced stages of oxidation.

I have been squirting WD40 at exposed threads but in the end it's brute force that triumphs, when bolt shank and hole have all but amalgamated. A couple of times I had to resort to grinder and cold chisel but so far most of the fixings have given in with good grace.

It seemed hateful work at first, squatting in a shower of rusty shale and impacted road dirt. But after a couple of days I'm beginning to enjoy seeing the pile of bits mount up. Here are a couple of pics. If you're of a nervous disposition, turn away now.


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Post by JSalix » Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:53 pm

Rear bumper moulding removed


JSalix
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Post by JSalix » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:08 am

Dismantling of the Handbrake continues. It's not a pretty sight under there and each session turns up new horrors and puzzles. Does anyone have a definitive solution to this one? The seal on the input shaft seems fine. It's dry around the back but oil is finding its way down the shaft and emerging between the propshaft flanges. It's been doing it for a while. There's no rust on that section of chassis!



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